Bobcat – Lynx rufus

Named because of their short tails, bobcats exist throughout most of the United States, southern Canada, and the northern half of Mexico. They are abundant in Texas and are comprised of one subspecies, Lynx rufus texensis. Twelve subspecies exist throughout the United States.

Male bobcats weigh about 26 pounds, while females are smaller at 20 pounds. They’re about 35 inches in length. Bobcats eat mostly small animals, such as rats, squirrels, mice, and rabbits. They may also prey on quail, songbirds, porcupines and skunks. They are spotted cats with short tails and long fur at their jowls. Females typically produce a litter of three kittens, and they remain with their mothers about six months. Their favored habitats include swamps, deserts, and mountain ranges but particularly prefer rocky canyons or outcrops. Females typically produce a litter of three kittens, and they remain with their mothers about six months. Their favored habitats include swamps, deserts, and mountain ranges but particularly prefer rocky canyons or outcrops. Their range is 25 – 30 square miles for males and five square miles for females.

 

The bobcat is the most widely harvested feline species for its fur.

Key points about bobcats

  • Bobcats are closely related to the lynx
  • Cats are highly adaptable and thrive in urban areas
  • Pelts are used in the fur trade
  • They are non-game species in Texas and have no protection
  • Habitat loss is biggest threat

Bobcat Kittens

Baby bobcat
Bobcat mother and kittens